Yes, I drink coffee a lot but I’m not aware of the facts about coffee just only the taste of the coffee. Life-threatening facts about coffee and some background about the coffee are stated below.

History Of Coffee

It is assumed that coffee was first discovered in the 15th century in Yemen. Records indicate that in the town of Mocha, the Sufi Muslim monasteries brewed a dark drink. The drinking of coffee then spread across the Middle East and North Africa. While rumors about coffee origins exist, this famous beverage’s most likely birthplace was the Yemeni monasteries.

Coffee was first created in the 15th century, and to this day it retains its position as one of the most popular drinks, with millions of coffee drinkers around the world. The black brew is made from ripe berries that are picked, processed, and dried from the coffee farm.

Origin Of The Word “Coffee”

People believe that the term “coffee” entered the English language some time in the 16th century. It was apparently borrowed from the Italian word “caffe,” derived from the Dutch word “koffie,” taken from the Turkish Ottoman word “kahve,” extracted from the Arabic word “qahwah.” 

Interesting Facts About Coffee

These ‘beans’ are roasted once dry and ground to be brewed into the coffee drink we all know and love. Coffee has evolved into a multi-billion-dollar industry over the centuries and has become part of our lifestyle and cultural phenomena. 

Facts About Coffee

But do you know any interesting facts about your favorite beverage? If not, have a look:  

1. Coffee beans are originally cherry seeds  

Coffee comes from a bush-like flowering plant that cultivates cherries. They’re picked, processed, and dried until ripened. Every cherry contains two to three seeds known as coffee ‘beans’ by the average individual.

The fruit of the plant is not very pulpy, but it is edible. The taste depends on the rising area, the atmosphere, and other variables, but the general opinion is that they are sweet like honey. 

2. One can overdose on coffee 

A life-threatening overdose of caffeine is highly unlikely, but it is possible. Most deaths are accidental and the culprit is over-the-counter medicine, not beverages, according to a 2018 medical study.

To stay healthy, the FDA recommends drinking a maximum of 400 milligrams of caffeine per day. It’s an estimated four 8-ounce cups of coffee brewed. Migraines, elevated heart rate, muscle tremors, nausea, and dysphoria may lead to more.

With the intake of 1,200 milligrams of caffeine or more, more severe side effects, like seizures and hallucinations, are likely to occur.

3. Coffee could prolong the life of your cat

Maybe it’s a coincidence, but the Guinness World Record holder for “Oldest Cat Ever,” was a 38-year-old kitty called Creme Puff who drank coffee every morning plus enjoying bacon, eggs, and broccoli.

Consider this before you ignore that outright: The cat that Creme Puff beat out for the record (a 34-year-old cat, properly called Grandpa Rex Allen) had the same owner, and the exact same diet was fed.

4. A goat herder discovered coffee 

Coffee was said to have been found in Ethiopia in the 1500s by a goat herder. He saw his goats eating the cherries of coffee. He noticed a shift in their actions afterward; they gained a significant amount of energy and did not sleep at night.

The herder shared his observations with the local monks. They discovered they could stay up all night and pray after making their own drink out of coffee beans. Word spread to other monks in Ethiopia and soon reached all over the civilized world.

5. Hawaii is the only coffee-producing state in the US.

Good coffee growing conditions rely on variables such as elevated altitudes, tropical climates, and rich soil.

Thus, Hawaii is the only state suitable for growing coffee plants, amid all the rich and varied ecosystems of the Continental United States. Even before it was a state, it produced coffee. Recently, though, farmers have started to grow coffee bushes in California.  

6. World’s 1st webcam was inspired by coffee 

In 1991, researchers at the University of Cambridge in England set up a camera in the “Trojan Room” to feed a live image of a coffee machine so that workers could see whether the pot was full or not.

If they could see that it was empty ahead of time, it would save them a trip and inevitable frustration. The camera was linked to the Internet a few years later and quickly became an international phenomenon. People watched from all parts of the world until it was turned off for good in 2001. 

Facts About Coffee

7. Coffee sent brazil to the Olympics 

For the Summer Olympics in 1932, Brazil could not afford to send its 69 athletes to Los Angeles, so they put them on a ship with 50,000 bags of coffee and sold the beans along the way at various ports. Brazil has been the largest coffee producer globally for more than 150 years, so they had coffee beans to spare. 

8. Cat poop is the most expensive coffee produced. 

“Kopi Luwak” is the world’s most expensive coffee. It comes from Indonesia and is made from the Asian Palm Civet digested beans. It comes from cat litter. It sells for €350 per kilo and higher!

9. Finland is the coffee king of the world 

The most caffeinated country in the world? Ah, Finland! Finnish drinkers nevertheless manage to eat almost three times as much coffee as Americans per year, although the nation does not produce any beans of its own. The top five are Norway, Iceland, Denmark, and the Netherlands. 

10. Instant coffee is around 250 years old  

As demonstrated by the fact that instant coffee made its first appearance in England in 1771, convenience has long been a problem for coffee drinkers. Over the years, the process progressed until the first mass-produced instant coffee was introduced and patented in the United States in 1910. And it continued to evolve into the 1960s when it made its debut with freeze-dried coffee (still a common method). 

11. There have been many attempts to completely ban coffee

Governments have been attempting to ban coffee as early as the 18th century. Its propensity to stimulate “radical thinking” was among the many reasons for outlawing the drink. Sweden took it to an extreme in 1746 when it outlawed both coffee and coffee paraphernalia (i.e., cups and saucers).

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(Last Updated On: February 15, 2021)